TechnoPoetics

Loom and Doom

 Neath Layer

Ghosties

Abstracts

Loom and Doom

. . .how the classical ideas of technos and poesia were born as one, came to be separated, what was thus lost, and what is gained by reuniting them (under the working name, technopoetics).  --from TechnoPoetic Utopia

Metapoetics:  Interwoven Definitions of Poesis, Poetics, and Techne, Too

rav·el (rvl) v. rav·eled, also rav·elled, rav·el·ing, rav·el·ling, rav·els, rav·els. 
v. tr. 

1.To separate the fibers or threads of (cloth, for example); unravel.

2.To clarify by separating the aspects of. 

3.To tangle or complicate.

Afissa by Christos Apostolakis, woven photograph

 

Patchwork Quilt, by David Paul Bacharach - woven and constructed copper and steel.
Patinated with heat and chemicals.
4'H X 7'W, photograph by Charles Luce 

I find this focus on etymology a little nostalgic. Technology's current meaning is irrelevant to its relation to "techne," and however comforting it might be to recall the roles of craft and skill in order to oppose them to the Amerikan Church of Mammon, this operation sheds precious little light on the ways in which women's access to the power represented by information technology is or is not limited by other factors.

  --Diane Greco in Women and Technology:  Beyond the Binary.

If techné, as the essence of technology which is itself nothing technological, is a way of revealing our world, a way of showing and setting up, then as such it is also a movement of poesis. And this poetictechnological revealing could not then be contained or confined within a conceptual schema. One couldn't grasp its totality for this essentially indeterminate totality would have already set the stage within which something like our world might meaningfully come into play.

--from On techné by Malcolm Riddoch. 

Paris-Gizeh by Christos Apostolakis, woven photograph.

Images from Patchwork Girl stolen shamelessly from the Eastgate Systems Catalog

The athletic leap across divides has its own aesthetic, and so does the pattern those leaps form in the air, or, to be more exact, in the mind. People spend their lives forging such patterns for themselves, but only the cranks and the encyclopedic generalists with vague job descriptions, the Bill Moyerses, have the nerve to invite others to try out their own hobby-horseride through the World of Ideas. More often these are private pathways, possible to make out sometimes in a novelist's ouevre (rare butterflies turn up in Nabokov's fiction enough to make you guess that he was a lepidopterist, if you didn't know already) as a system of back alleys heading off from the work at hand, but not for public transit

--from Stitch Bitch: the patchwork girl by Shelley Jackson

In the text of The Republic, for the first time, the contribution of poesis to the political development of the community and to the individual well being of the individual lies at the heart of the argument. And ever since, in one way or another, our own concerns about the role of art, about methods of evaluating it, and about its various contributions (for better or worse) to our individual and collective lives have been decisively shaped by the discussion of it in The Republic. --from Lecture on Plato's Republic by Ian Johnston.

 


Plato's Pharmacy?

Detail of Lacing Up by Ken Danby, Poster Print.

Well, I'm not sure most poets or readers give much thought to poetics, which is about as interesting as talking of tofu instead of eating beancurd, and even if some poets do give it thought, very few of them are any more articulate about the whole business than your sweaty hockey player is when someone shoves a mike in his face at game's end and asks about how he scored the winning goal: stuff about the muses or voices or images arriving from out of the blue or cadences felt in the forearms is hardly any more satisfying an explanation than someone's saying, "the guys played good tonight and I was just in the right place when the puck came my way; after that, I put my head down and shot, and in she went." --from Poetry, Poetics, Criticism by Iain Higgins in Candadian Literature, A Quarterly of Criticism and Review.

. . .it's debatable whether a book on the aesthetics of cyberspace--with any claim on authority--can legitimately be written now.

--from Digital aesthetics: artistic movement or
oxymoron?
Bill Rosenblatt's review of Steven Holzman's Digital Mosaics:  The Aesthetics of Cyberspace.

TechnoPoetics

Loom and Doom

 Neath Layer

Ghosties

Abstracts

Kathy A. Fitch 
Assistant Professor of English ·  Liberal Arts Division ·  College of DuPage  
FitchK@cdnet.cod.edu  · Kafkaz@kwom.com  
05/16/01