TechnoPoetics

Loom and Doom

 Neath Layer

Ghosties

Abstracts

. . .this is a layer a writer usually silences.

When ideas float in our mind without any reflection or regard of the understanding, it is that which the French call revery, our language has scarce a name for it. --Locke.

To clarify by separating the aspects of. 
To tangle or complicate. 

Word History: To say that we will ravel the history of ravel is an ambiguous statement, given that history. Ravel comes from the obsolete Dutch verb ravelen, “to tangle, fray out, unweave,” which comes in turn from the noun ravel, “a loose thread.” We can see the ambiguity of ravel already in the notion of a loose thread, because threads can be loose when they are tangled or when they are untangling. The Dutch verb has both notions present in it, denoting both tangling and unweaving. In one of its earliest recorded uses in English (before 1585) the verb means “to become entangled or confused,” and in 1598 we find a use in the sense “to entangle.” But in 1611 the word is used with reference to a fabric in the sense “to fray out,” and in 1607 in the sense “to unwind, unweave, or unravel.” In 1582 we already have an author using the word in a figurative way to mean “to take to pieces or disentangle,” while in a work written before 1656 we have a figurative instance of the sense “to entangle or confuse.” Clearly there was a need for the word unravel, which is first found in 1603, but strangely enough it did not solve the problem, ravel retaining up to this day both “entangling” and “disentangling” senses.--entry from Dictionary.com

As with conceptions of poetic consciousness, then, a technopoetics can open spaces for creative revery in discussions of technology and the intellect. Rather than pragmatize our interactions with technology by merely couching them in terms of theory or pedagogy, we can revel in our relationships and creative engagements with technology. Such reveries can renew our approaches to technology-related work and allow us to revisit some important issues and questions. --from Technopoetic Revery: Connecting Intellecreativity and Technology by Daniel Anderson.

TechnoPoetics

Loom and Doom

 Neath Layer

Ghosties

Abstracts

Kathy A. Fitch 
Assistant Professor of English ·  Liberal Arts Division ·  College of DuPage  
FitchK@cdnet.cod.edu  · Kafkaz@kwom.com  
05/16/01